WAGE THEFT FAQ

 

What is wage theft?

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What laws are broken in wage theft cases?

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In what types of workplace or industry does wage theft occur?

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Is wage theft concentrated in a particular region?

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Where do workers turn if their wages have been stolen?

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What kind of solution is needed?

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What type of legislation is needed?

  1. Mandate that employers give workers pay stubs, so that they can accurately calculate their hours and earnings and have a record if they need to prove they were cheated.
  2. Fix the statute of limitations on wage claims, which currently has many cases thrown out because the DOL has not been able to resolve them in two years.
  3. Protect workers from retaliation for filing complaints with government agencies.
  4. Create mandatory minimum penalties for employers who repeatedly violate the law.
  5. Provide resources to community organizations to partner with the DOL to eliminate wage theft and win back wages.

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What legislation is being worked on?

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What can I do?

For Students:

  1. Volunteer at at nearby organization involved in the fight for worker justice. View wagetheft.org's interactive map to find an organization near you.
  2. Join/Found a JWJ/USSA Student Labor Activist Project (SLAP) at your university.
  3. If you are a Seminary, Rabbinical, or Islamic graduate student consider applying for the Seminary Summer & Islamic Internship for Worker Justice.  It is a 10-week paid internship for seminary, rabbinical, and Muslim graduate students combining education, action, and reflection. Participants are placed at labor unions around the country to support campaigns involving workers in low-wage jobs
  4. Download the Worker Justice Immersion Toolkit. The toolkit will assist you in developing a program to immerse participants in the intersections of faith and worker justice. Whether you have a few hours or a full week, this toolkit has an abundance of materials to guide you through the process of developing a worker justice immersion experience. 

    IWJ can assist you with developing a schedule of events, connecting to resources in your area, and finding speakers and community partners to enhance your experience.

  5. Consider applying for an IWJ Summer Internship.  The Interfaith Worker Justice Summer Internship is a 10-week program for undergraduate students who want to be active in the worker justice movement.

For Concerned Citizens/Advocates/Workers

  1. Organize a delegation of religious leaders and workers to meet with your representative and senators. Ask them to co-sponsor the Stop Wage Theft Bill.  The Worker Justice Immersion Toolkit can help, as well as the IWJ Wage Theft Toolkit (For the Spanish version click here).
  2. Hold an educational forum for your congregation or student group on Wage Theft. Invite workers, worker center leaders, and IWJ leaders to speak.  To learn more about reaching out to congregations go here and here.  For more information about student groups go here.
  3. Volunteer at at nearby organization involved in the fight for worker justice. View wagetheft.org's interactive map to find an organization near you.
  4. Make sure all businesses you patronize pay their workers fairly and legally.
  5. Write to your congress person about worker justice issues.  Click here to learn how.
  6. To obtain more resources on Wage Theft and to keep yourself updated on the Wage Theft campaign please review IWJ's Wage Theft Resource Page.

For Businesses and Employers

  1. Do not let your business suffer because of unscrupulous competitors.  Report illegal labor practices that skew the marketplace in favor of unscrupulous businesses to the Department of Labor.  Find your local Department of Labor Wage and Hour office here
  2. Make sure that all workers you hire are paid all of their earned wages
  3. Make sure you are in compliance with all DOL Wage and Hour regulations

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Further Reading: